Monday, April 29, 2013

National Genealogical Society Announces Release of New York City, Long Island, and Westchester County Research Guide


Contact: Terry Koch-Bostic

Phone: 516-319-1659                                                                                                                                

E-mail: kochbostic@aol.com                                                                                                                  

For Release: 29 April 2013




Arlington, VA, 29 April 2013: The National Genealogical Society announces the release of the newest edition in its Research in the States series: Research in New York City, Long Island, and Westchester County. This publication was written by native New Yorker and nationally recognized genealogist Laura Murphy DeGrazia, CG, FGBS. Laura is a trustee and former president of BCG and co-editor of the NYG&B Record. Barbara Vines Little, CG, FNGS, FVGS, is a former NGS president and is the current editor of the NGS Research in the States series and the Magazine of Virginia Genealogy.

Research in New York City, Long Island, and Westchester County is an introduction to resources and repositories essential to genealogical research in these geographic areas. “Millions of Americans have ancestors who spent some time in the New York City, Long Island, and Westchester County area,” said Laura Murphy DeGrazia, author, “and knowing what resources exist and where they are located can help family historians be more successful in their research.”

The guide will be available for sale at the NGS 2013 Family History Conference in Las Vegas from 8–11 May in the NGS booth (#205). Author Laura Murphy DeGrazia will be available for book signings at the NGS conference booth on Thursday, 9 May from 9:00 a.m.–10:50 a.m.

Research in New York City, Long Island, and Westchester County will be available in the NGS store at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/research_in_the_states in a PDF and print version beginning 8 May; the print version will ship after 20 May. Other titles in the Research in the States series, which are also available in PDF and print form, include Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. Additional states and a full New York State guide are planned for the future.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records.  The Arlington, VA-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.  Please visit the NGS Pressroom for further information.

-End-


Mark Your Calendars
NGS 2013 Family History Conference, 8-11 May, Las Vegas, Nevada.


Sunday, April 28, 2013

Church Record Sunday #NGS2013 Edition: UNLV Libraries

The National Genealogical Society Conference in Las Vegas is almost here. So to gear up for that week, I thought I would share some resources for church records in Las Vegas.

So right about now, you're thinking, "I don't have ancestors in Vegas." Well, neither do I but the methodology  and the type of resources I'm going to point out might be of use to you no matter where your ancestors are from.

So for Church Records Sunday this week, let's explore the library collections of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.



UNLV has all kinds of collections for local history and that include images from early Vegas which is decidedly different than the mental picture most people have when they hear the words "Las Vegas."

For example, here's a link for one early  photo of the First Methodist Church. There's other photos available including one for Good Shepherd Lutheran Church.

UNLV Libraries website, like most university libraries,  includes  some digitized collections and online exhibits including one on Nevada Women's Archives  that includes materials from church groups and clubs.

UNLV Library  has a Nevada History guide that includes links for Nevada historical research including newspapers, history timelines, and an online encyclopedia among other collections. Genealogists with Nevada roots should check out this list.

Make sure as you seek out church records that you check out the collections of a university library for the state or the region your ancestor was from.

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

NGS Announces Release of Mastering Genealogical Proof by Dr. Thomas Jones


Contact: Darrell Jackson
jacksonda@aol.com                                                                                                                                   
For Release: 24 April 2013

NGS Announces Release of Mastering Genealogical Proof
by Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG, CGL, FASG, FNGS






ARLINGTON, VA, 24 april 2013: The National Genealogical Society announces the release of Mastering Genealogical Proof by Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG, CGL, FASG, FNGS. As a unique textbook on genealogical methods and reasoning in the twenty-first century, Mastering Genealogical Proof guides readers in acquiring genealogical skills transcending chronological, ethnic, geopolitical, and religious boundaries. Dr. Jones, a noted writer, lecturer, and editor in the field of genealogy, explains and develops the level of proof that is appropriate to genealogy.

Dr. Jones relies on his vast experience as a genealogist to explain the various concepts and techniques involved in the genealogical research process.Mastering Genealogical Proof aims to help researchers, students, and new family historians reconstruct relationships and lives of people they cannot see. It presents content in digestible chunks. Each chapter concludes with problems providing practice for proficiently applying the chapter’s concepts. Those problems, like examples throughout the book, use real records, real research, and real issues.

Mastering Genealogical Proof will first be available for purchase at the NGS 2013 Family History Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, 8–11 May 2013. Dr. Jones will also be available for book signings at the NGS booth (#205) in the exhibit hall on Friday, 10 May, from 10:45 a.m.–12:00 noon and on Saturday, 11 May, from 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Purchases may be made in advance of the signings in the NGS booth starting at 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday, 8 May, when the conference exhibit hall opens. Mastering Genealogical Proof may also be pre-ordered from the NGS online store at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records.  The Arlington, VA-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.  Please visit the NGS Pressroom for further information.
-End-



Mark Your Calendars
NGS 2013 Family History Conference, 8-11 May, Las Vegas, Nevada.



My Grandma was a Cherokee Princess and Einstein Hated Cell Phones

One of my favorite posts on Facebook that crops up every once in a while is a photo of Abraham Lincoln and a quote:





Honest Abe is right, no doubt about it. But it's clear that he didn't say that. Right away you know it's a joke.

The problem of believing the  written or  spoken word  has long been an issue for humans. Consider another quote making the way around social media websites attributed to  Albert Einstein.

memegenerator.net

"I fear the day that technology will surpass our human interaction. The world will have a generation of idiots."


Now, this quote sometimes accompanies a photo of Einstein, sometimes it is attached to an image that features people with their zombie-like stares on their cell phones. Did Einstein hate technology? Did he fear for the future? Who knows, but there's a problem with this quote.

Einstein didn't say that.

According to the blogger at the Quote Investigator, this quote does not appear in the work, The Ultimate Quotable Einstein, edited by Alice Calaprice. Variations of this quote  have been in circulation for years but none of them seem to  be the words of Einstein.

So how is it that I see that quote about once a week or more, in English and Spanish, on Facebook?
Well it's like those forwarded emails you get. Where someone makes a statement about the President, or a certain group of people, or whatever and then sends it to their  friends and family. And then that person forwards it. As that vintage shampoo commercial said "and so on and so on and so on..."

And if you forward it enough it starts to seem like it's true, afterall it's all over the Internet.

Now this is where the genealogy comes in

Family stories are a lot like that. If your grandmother tells you a story consistently over her life about her grandmother, is it true? Are you related to Cherokee princesses or someone that rode with Jesse James or descended from George Washington?

Now I'm not calling grandma a liar. We hear things, people reinterpret them and tell them and pretty soon it's like that childhood game of telephone. In some cases, stories might be told to explain something we have no explanation for. Grandma must have been Native American because she had darker skin then the rest of us or we have the same surname as this famous person and my dad looks like that person so it must be true. Sometimes stories may have a sliver of truth but were "enhanced" for the sake of telling a better story. And then there's stories that grandma was telling to pull your leg but you never knew that. (I still love the fact that my maternal grandmother told one of my cousins that if he ate a watermelon seed it would grow in his stomach.)

One of the great things I get to do every month is lead a discussion for the National Institute for Genealogical Studies on an article written by Connie Lenzen, CGRS entitled, Heritage Books and Family Lore: A Jackson Test in Missouri and Idaho from the NGS Quarterly, March 1998.

In this article Connie is researching family stories, specifically those that we find in heritage books but this could include those that are told to us. Connie provides steps to determining the validity of a family story.  These steps are:


  • Consider the Source
  • Determine the Probability that the Event Occurred
  • Place Individuals in Time and Location
  • Thoroughly Comb Extant Records 
These steps help us to ascertain the probability of a story even before we begin any serious research. If you are told your grandfather rode with Jesse James but he was an infant when James was robbing banks, then that story is not true. There's no reason to continue the research.

Genealogically, we have numerous sources to help us determine probability including maps and gazetteers,  newspapers, and histories. We then can go on to extant sources, those sources that still exist, such as government records, church records, newspapers, and manuscripts.

While it can be flattering and easier to just repeat the stories that you have read or heard, take some time to check them out. Otherwise in two generations those stories will morph into something like "My Cherokee Princess grandmother hated cell phone just like Einstein."

P.S.

Is there a way to tell whether those forwarded emails that are true? Yes, Snopes is one source you can use to search out urban legends and follow the trail to how they developed. 

Monday, April 22, 2013

Last Chance Today to Purchase Tickets for Meals and Tours for the NGS 2013 Family History Conference


Contact: Erin Shifflett
Phone: (703) 525-0050                                                                                                                              
eshifflett@ngsgenealogy.org                                                                                                                  
For Release: 22 April 2013





ARLINGTON, VA, 22 APRIL 2013: Tick tock! Today is your last chance to purchase tickets for meals and tours and to pre-register for the NGS 2013 Family History Conference, 8–11 May at the LVH-Las Vegas Hotel and Casino. Pre-registration for the conference and ticket sales for meals and tours ends today, 22 April, at 11:59 p.m. EDT.

The conference begins in two weeks. You can still purchase tickets for meals, the Museums Tour, and the Hoover Dam Tour. The BCG Education Fund Workshop, Librarian’s Day, and the Night Tour of the Strip and Downtown are sold out.

To be placed on the wait list for the BCG Education Fund Workshop or Librarian’s, e-mail the NGS conference registrar, Courtney Holmes, at cholmes@ngsgenealogy.org.  To register for the conference, visit http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/conference_info. For tour information visit Las Vegas Area Tours at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/conferences_events/annual_conference/las_vegas_area_tours.
On-site conference registration opens Tuesday, 7 May 2013, 12:00 p.m.−7:00 p.m. We look forward to seeing you in Las Vegas!


Add Items to an Existing Registration
Meals and tours cannot be purchased on-site. Ticket sales close today, 22 April 2013.

Meals: log on at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org, click on My Account, select My Events, and then click to Add Sessions.

Tours: log on at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org, click on My Account, and then select Upcoming Events.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records.  The Arlington, VA-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.  Please visit the NGS Pressroom for further information.

-End-



Mark Your Calendars
NGS 2013 Family History Conference, 8-11 May, Las Vegas, Nevada.

Sunday, April 21, 2013

Church Record Sunday: Digital Public Library of America

It's always exciting when a new resource comes online. This week Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) debuted.


What is the DPLA? According to their history page:

Many universities, public libraries, and other public-spirited organizations have digitized materials, but these digital collections often exist in silos. The DPLA  brings these different viewpoints, experiences, and collections together in a single platform and portal, providing open and coherent access to our society’s digitized cultural heritage.

You can read more about this new resource from this article by Public Radio International.

A search on the keyword "church" brought up 32,451 hits. This is the total hits for today, as DPLA has other items added that number will grow. Below, I highlighted some of the features of this website including a breakdown of the types of formats and institutions.



Here's an example of one hit for a 1913 booklet commemorating the opening of a Swedish Christian Mission Church in Duluth Minnesota.


Take an opportunity to search this website by a keyword or keyword phrase including the name of the church your ancestor attended, the auxiliary they were a member of, and the place they lived.

This is a great resource for all kinds of digitized documents. Whether you are researching church records or other types of documents and images, check the Digital Public Library of America out!

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Join me on Friday for What's Up Genealogy?

I'm looking forward to spending Friday night on What's Up Genealogy? with Caroline Pointer. Join us on Google+ or watch it on Caroline's YouTube Channel.





Wednesday, April 17, 2013

I LOVE Libraries! And So Should You

It's National Library Week and as many of my readers know, I LOVE libraries.  The following are some of my thoughts about libraries and why genealogists need the help of a librarian. To learn more about libraries, see Madaleine J. Laird's post today, My Favorite Part of the Library? The Catalog! on her blog Kinfolit.


Books! (c) 2012 Gena Philibert-Ortega

Why Every Genealogist Needs a Librarian

I’m often surprised when genealogists tell me that they don’t know what interlibrary loan is or they rarely visit their local library. I think that unfortunately as family historians  we too often think that everything we need can be found online. But that thinking could not be further from the truth. Libraries and librarians can provide new ideas, search techniques, and help us break down brick walls in ways that we would have never guessed. Librarians are essential to family history research.

Interlibrary Loan

Interlibrary loan is such an important tool for the genealogist. Through interlibrary loan a whole world of resources opens up to you that you would otherwise not have access to. Simply put, interlibrary loan allows you to borrow a book from a library that is either some distance from your home or one where you do not have borrower’s privileges. You request the item/s from your local library’s reference librarian and pay a small fee. Your reference librarian sends off for the item and within a short amount of time it is sent to your library. At that point you will be able to check out the item or use it at your library.  Interlibrary loan is not just for books, you can also in some cases borrow microfilmed records and journal articles.

Whenever you start a new research project I recommend that you search through your local library’s catalog, the library that serves the area where your ancestor lived and local university/college 
libraries. Find  links for libraries by using Libraries in the United States. You can also search a        large number of libraries by using WorldCat.  

WorldCat is a union catalog with over 1.5 billion items held by the world’s libraries. For new users, I would suggest that you check out the “What is WorldCat” page .

Midwest Genealogy Center (c) 2010 Gena Philibert-Ortega


They Can Find Anything

I would say that I am pretty good at research. I would venture to say that I am a really good researcher. However, librarians are taught different ways to search for items and they are aware of collections, databases, and websites that can enhance your research.

When we search for our ancestors we tend to just search genealogy related websites that we are aware of, commercial sites, free genealogy sites, etc.  But there may be other types of materials and websites that can be useful in our search. Sometimes because we are so accustomed to looking at the same sites over and over again we may miss out on those that can help us. A good case in point is some social history research I am doing on the food our ancestors ate. I was able to find some books and website that I thought looked promising, but my friend, who is studying to become a librarian, was able to find for me social networks, dissertations, and academic sources that frankly would have not been part of my search results. It was interesting as we both worked on this search, she on her computer and I on mine, that we were both able to find completely unique sources but they were all very important. We are often more effective when we collaborate than when we just tackle something completely on our own.

Haven’t stepped foot in a library for a while?  Ask the reference librarian for a tour. Ask what resources would be of use to you in your research. Inquire about the service and benefits of being a library card holder. One of the great new features of libraries today versus 10-20 years ago is that for many libraries having a library cards allows you to access a variety of online sources, normally paid sites, for free. These sites can include Ancestry Library Edition, Heritage Quest, and others. 

Librarians know their collection as well as other library collections so they are the ones to ask when you are stuck or need to know what resources exist. They know about resources that the general public is not knowledgeable about. That’s what they went to school for, to learn how to find information.

Midwest Genealogy Center. (c) 2010 Gena Philibert-Ortega



You Can Ask Librarians Questions

One of my favorite features on many library websites is an interactive feature typically labeled Ask A Librarian. This feature allows you various ways to contact a librarian including through a chat room and texting. I have used this to ask   questions, research advice and even about a specific resource. Don’t forget that you can ask librarians from public libraries and university libraries questions via the library website, even if you just email them. This can help you in your research and is often a fast way to get a question answered.

Obviously, the librarian isn’t going to do your research for you but quick requests and questions are what they are there for.


And There’s More…

These are just a few of the ideas about why you need a librarian when you research your family tree. Start today by contacting your local library and finding out how they can assist you in breaking down your ancestral brick walls.





**Article excerpted, originally ran from a GenWeekly article by Gena Philibert-Ortega. Published in GenWeekly, www.genweekly.com, 1 June 2010.



Tuesday, April 16, 2013

One Week to Purchase Tickets for Meals, Tours, and Pre-Conference Events for the NGS 2013 Family History Conference





Contact: Erin Shifflett
Phone: (703) 525-0050                                                                                                                              
eshifflett@ngsgenealogy.org                                                                                                                  
For Release: 16 April 2013



ARLINGTON, VA, 16 APRIL 2013: The NGS 2013 Family History Conference will be held 8–11 May 2013 at the Las Vegas Hotel and Casino (LVH), Las Vegas, Nevada. Register within the week to select any meals or pre-conference events or tours you plan to attend. Pre-registration ends on Monday, 22 April 2013, which includes meals and tours sales. On-site conference registration opens Tuesday, 7 May 2013, 12:00 p.m.−7:00 p.m. Meals and pre-conference tours and events must be purchased by 22 April 2013. They cannot be purchased on-site at the conference.

You don’t want to miss this year’s exciting conference program from 8–11 May at the LVH-Las Vegas Hotel and Casino. For conference information and to register, go to http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/conference_info.

Space is still available for most conference social activities including meal events and the Tuesday bus tours. The BCG Education Fund Workshop is sold out. To be placed on the wait list, e-mail NGS conference registrar, Courtney Holmes, at cholmes@ngsgenealogy.org.


Breakfasts, Luncheons, and the NGS Banquet
Participating organizations sponsor several breakfasts and luncheons during the conference, and the NGS Banquet is an event not to be missed! Make your reservation by the deadline, 22 April, at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/attendee_registration. Tickets for social events will not be sold on-site. Breakfasts are $28; luncheons are $32; and the banquet is $51. Menus are in the registration brochure at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/galleries/new-gallery/2013_Conference_Registration_Brochure_20_November.pdf.


Las Vegas Area Tours
There’s still time to sign up for three exciting Las Vegas area tours on Tuesday, 7 May. Tour tickets are available only until 22 April 2013.

Hoover Dam and Ethel M. Chocolates Tour: This six-hour tour allows participants to explore the rich history of the Hoover Dam, enjoy a buffet lunch, and tour a chocolate factory and botanical garden.

Museum Tour: Tour the 30-acre Clark County Museum and the National Atomic Testing Museum in this five-hour tour.

Night Tour: Experience the full brilliance of neon Las Vegas in a five-hour tour of the Las Vegas Strip and Downtown!

For more information, please see Las Vegas Area Tours at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/conferences_events/annual_conference/las_vegas_area_tours.


Add Items to an Existing Registration
Meals and pre-conference events and tours cannot be purchased on-site. Ticket sales close 22 April 2013.

Pre-Conference Events and Tours: log on at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org, click on My Account, and then select Upcoming Events.

Meals: log on at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org, click on My Account, select My Events, and then click to Add Sessions

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records.  The Arlington, VA-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.  Please visit the NGS Pressroom for further information.



Mark Your Calendars
NGS 2013 Family History Conference, 8-11 May, Las Vegas, Nevada.

Sunday, April 14, 2013

Join Dear Myrtle and me for Your Library in the Cloud

I will be joining Dear Myrtle on Monday, April 15th for a Google Hangout on Air. Join us as we talk about one of my favorite subjects, Google Books.




We start broadcasting at:

9pm Eastern (New York)
8pm Central (Chicago)
7pm Mountain (Denver, Salt Lake City)
6pm Pacific  (Los Angeles)

If you need a time zone converter, there is a great one located here: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

HERE'S HOW TO JOIN A HANGOUT ON AIR
The first ten people who join must have voice capabilities. The exact link cannot be shown until the Hangout on Air is created. Standby at DearMYRTLE's Genealogy Community on Google+ located here:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/104382659430904043232

JOINers will have full chat and voice capabilities, and video capabilities if they have a video cam. All JOINers may elect to share their screen when called upon by the moderator.
==========================
If you attempt to JOIN the Hangout On Air and receive the notice that the Hangout On Air is full, then go to the VIEW option listed below.
==========================
HERE'S HOW TO VIEW THE HANGOUT ON AIR LIVE
You may view the Hangout On Air live on DearMYRTLE's YouTube Channel located here: http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE

The Hangout will not start appearing here until I press the record button at the top of the hour. It may take a minute for the video stream to kick in.

HERE'S HOW VIEWERS CAN POST COMMENTS
If during viewing of the live broadcast of this Hangout On Air you'd like to post comments do so back at DearMYRTLE's Genealogy Community on Google+, perhaps on a different tab on your web browser. Ol' Myrt's community is located here:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/104382659430904043232

==========================
IF YOU MISS THE LIVE HANGOUT ON AIR OR WANT TO REVIEW IT LATER
The archived version of a Google Hangout On Air appears usually within 30 minutes of the close of the recorded session. You will find it on DearMYRTLE's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE

You will also find a posting about it at
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com



Church Record Sunday: Baptist Association Minutes




Have Baptist ancestors? You may be interested in Baptist Association Minutes found in various places online. Below is just a few links, to find other similar resources try using Google, Google Books or Internet Archive.

Check out some of these resources:

Minutes of the Philadelphia Baptist Association, 1707-1807
You can learn more about the Philadelphia Baptist Association here.

Tennessee River Baptist Association Minutes 1899

Minutes of the Leon River Baptist Association, 1871 (Texas)

South Carolina Baptist Association Minutes

Georgia Baptist Association and Convention Records

Baptist Association of Mississippi and Alabama Minutes 1839-1975

As you search for church records and resources, don't forget to search the library catalogs of theological schools. Here's an example of Minutes available at Fuller Theological Seminary Library in Southern California.

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Hello, My Name is…: Genealogy Business Cards



Going to NGS 2013? Are you preparing for the conference? All participants should prepare for going to a conference, not just the speakers, organizers and exhibitors.  

One of the things you should do now in preparation is to print business cards.

I know, I know, you’re not in the business of genealogy, so why should you have business cards? Think of these as finding-cousins-and-fellow-researcher cards or networking-to-learn-more cards or even, here’s-my-surnames-I’m-researching cards.

Have you ever run into someone at a conference that you wanted to keep in touch with?  Or maybe you were making copies at the Family History Library and you ran into someone doing the exact same research.  Networking is important to your genealogy because it opens up new leads, information about websites, new cousins, etc.  It’s through genealogical networking that we are able to become better genealogists.  

One easy, fast way to let others know who you are researching and provide your contact information is by putting together business cards. Business cards are not just for business people, they are an inexpensive way to help people remember who you are and how to get in touch with you.

Once you have business cards, then you will want to carry them with you to give out to family members, other researchers, at research repositories, FamilySearch Centers, conferences, and seminars.  Basically anywhere were you might find people interested in the places or surnames that you are researching.



Putting it Together

The type of information that you choose to put on your card may differ depending on your research.  I would suggest thinking about using both sides of the card-and if a business card is too small-consider using a postcard.  Some ideas for your business card info include:

  • Name, address, phone number
  • Email address
  • Your websites or blogs
  • Social Networking sites you belong to like Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest
  • Family history books you have authored
  • URL’s for photos you have uploaded to sites like Flicker
  • Genealogy/historical societies you belong too
  • Counties you research
  • Surnames you are researching
  • Any other research interests (Salem Witch Trials, Quaker Research, Civil War Ancestors, etc.)

Now that you know what you want on your card, you may need to find someone to design and or print it.  Several options exist here and depending on your needs and financial considerations you can choose what’s right for you.  You can save money by using a template in a program like Microsoft Office and then print the cards using an Avery business card template paper on your printer. If you do not own those programs, check out Google Drive for templates. This is a free program to use, you just need to set up a Google sign in and password.

If you are not interested in creating and printing your own business cards, other options exist, both in brick and mortar stores as well as online.  Most office supply stores and copy centers can print out business cards. Several online vendors can provide you with business cards, postcards and other printed items. Vista Print is an inexpensive option that you may want to consider.



What do I use? I use Moo for my business cards. I like the way they look and the options they provide. Use one side of your card for information and the other to showcase an image of an ancestor, a photo of your ancestral homeland or other images you love and that conveys your ancestry. Best part is they allow you to upload a different image for each business card in your order. That’s enough to share lots of ancestral photos.

Post NGS2013

Now what do you do when you get home and you have a ton of business cards? Well that’s up to you but one of my suggestions is to follow-up. Send an email, ask a question, or follow those contacts through social media websites. Looking for a way to store all of those business cards? Here’s a product that was recently reviewed by Shannon Combs Bennett on the In-Depth Genealogist.

Start now and get your business cards ready. I’ll see you at NGS and I look forward to exchanging cards with you.




Monday, April 08, 2013

Countdown to NGS 2013: NGS 2013 Mobile App


**Gena's Note: Before you attend a conference, make sure you do your homework. The NGS 2013 app gives you that opportunity with lists of speakers, presentations, and so much more. The following press release provides information on the app and where to download it.


Contact: Erin Shifflett
Phone: (703) 525-0050                                                                                                                                
eshifflett@ngsgenealogy.org                                                                                                                    
For Release: 8 April 2013


NGS Mobile App is ready for download
Arlington, VA, 8 April 2013: The National Genealogical Society announces the release of its NGS Conference App. Get the most from your NGS 2013 Family History Conference experience by downloading the new and improved mobile app. Use the NGS Conference App to help you make the most of your trip to Las Vegas before, during, and after the conference.

The NGS Conference App is completely free! Improve your conference experience by taking the schedule, maps, Twitter, and more with you on your phone or other mobile device.

The app is available for iOS, Android, Blackberry, Windows Phone, and web-enabled devices.

The NGS Conference App is easy to use with these convenient features:
  • The Dashboard keeps you organized with up-to-the-minute info.
  • About This Show keeps all show information in one place.
  • Alerts allow attendees to receive important real-time communications from the show organizer.
  • The built-in Twitter feed allows you to follow and join in on the show chatter.
  • Sync your schedule across multiple devices.
  • Attendees can locate exhibitors they want to visit.
  • Connect, message, and share schedules with your colleagues through the Friends feature.

To download the NGS Conference App, go to http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/maximize_your_experience.

For NGS Mobile App image, go to http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/media.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records.  The Arlington, VA-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.  Please visit the NGS Pressroom for further information.
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Gayathri Kher

3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300
Arlington, VA 22204
gkher@ngsgenealogy.org

Mark Your Calendars
NGS 2013 Family History Conference, 8-11 May, Las Vegas, Nevada.

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Sunday, April 07, 2013

Church Record Sunday: Church Postcards

Park Avenue Memorial Baptist Church. Springfield Mass. Collection of Gena Philibert-Ortega


I've spotlighted postcards as a source for your genealogy before on Church Record Sunday. A previous  post looked at the New York Public Library Digital Gallery and their collection. Postcards provide images that can help tell your family's story. All types of postcards exist, including those that depict churches.

Methodist Episcopal Church. Attleboro, Mass. Collection of Gena Philibert-Ortega

Where do you find such postcards? Obviously one place to purchase them is eBay, but there are collections of postcards for research purposes that exist in various places including manuscript collections. But you also need to do some Internet searching  because these collections can be found in all types of interesting places.

I love this blog, Vintage Postcard Collection of Alexandria Louisiana. Here you will find all kinds of postcards for Alexandria, including churches. Retronaut has a Flikr page that includes church postcards from Lynchburg, Virginia. Those with Richmond, Virginia ancestors might want to check Rarely Seen Richmond from Virginia Commonwealth University Digital Collections.

Immanuel Lutheran Church. Wichita, Kansas. Collection of Gena Philibert-Ortega


Images help to tell a story and vintage postcards can be part of telling the story of your ancestor's religious history.

Friday, April 05, 2013

Women's Research Resource: The Women's Army Corps 1945-1978



According to the Government Publication Office this book "Chronicles thirty-three years of WAC history from V-J Day 1945 to 1978, when the Women's Army Corps was abolished by Public Law 95-584 and discontinued by Department of the Army General Order 20, with the WAC officers assimilated into the other branches of the Army (except the combat arms). "

One of my favorite parts of this book is Appendix D which describes and shows the various WAC uniforms through their thirty-three year history.

While this book is available from the Government Publication Office, you can see a preview on GoogleBooks.

Thursday, April 04, 2013

Fiction: 13 Ways To Tell Your Ancestor Stories Book Tour Guest Post


**Note from Gena: It's my pleasure to have a guest post written by Dr. Bill Smith  of the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories blog. He has a 2nd edition of his 13 Ways to Tell Your Ancestor Stories book out now.




Today I want to share one more family storytelling technique that I don't speak a lot about in the new 2nd Edition of "13 Ways to Tell Your Ancestor Stories" that this book blog tour is all about. Use your family history and genealogy research, and your own personal experiences, to create Family Saga/Historical Fiction. Write fiction stories based on your research findings. You don't need to tell the exact stories you find,of course. Rather, create stories combining your imagination with the facts and relationships you have identified as you have done your reading, your living, and your research.

Personally, I find as a writer I cannot NOT write fiction based on my family history studies. As I research, my mind is constantly creating these other families in other worlds that can do what I may wish my families had done, or, they do things members of my family ought to have done - in my view. Creating fiction allows you to use those traits and habits and relationships you identify in your own story telling in ways without identifying who they were or embarrassing anyone. Genders, occupations or passions may be placed in your characters that came from real life but 'come to life' in another body in a fictional character acting out your story.

In my "The Homeplace Series"  I have created nearly 200 years of family history on a farm and a community in a valley in the Southern Missouri Ozarks from original settlement shortly after statehood to nearly the current time. There are two novels published, a novella releasing on April 9, and a short-story collection being previewed on the blog, so far. A third novel and another novella will be available within the coming year, with more to follow.

So, my family history storytelling includes both the traditional non-fiction storytelling of my ancestors as well as fictional family saga storytelling that is inspired by and strongly influenced by my actual family history and personal family experiences. Have you considered this approach to "Tell Your Ancestor Stories?" I hope you will give it some thought!

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

Sometimes a Business Card is Much More than a Business Card

Are business cards genealogy documents in disguise? They can be. I know when a family member died a few years back, his collection of business cards led me to relatives and their phone numbers. They also served as a timeline for his own life and where he worked over the years.

Consider this business card I picked up at a vintage paper fair this year.

Not only is the man's name, address, phone number and occupation listed  but at the top right he provides the names of his three daughters. While men's business cards are not typically seen as a source for female ancestors, in this case it is.



Business cards can carry important information  While there isn't many places to find them currently, be on the lookout for business cards as home sources in the homes of other family members.

Monday, April 01, 2013

Women's History Month 2013: A Recap

National Media Museum via Flickr the Commons, http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalmediamuseum/2780164461/



March marked Women's History Month and 31 days of resources for researching female ancestors here at Gena's Genealogy. I hope that you found the resources posted helpful and will lead you to many new discoveries in your family tree.

Because researching female ancestors is my passion, the resources for finding them won't just be limited to Women's History Month. Please check back here often as I post different resources and ideas for researching female ancestors.